Pediatric-Dentistry-Sub02-en

Fluoride Varnish Treatment

Why Fluoride Varnish?

Fluoride varnish is a treatment to apply fluoride on the tooth enamel to strengthen the tooth from bacteria, reduce the decay on the first stage and chances of getting new decay.

 

 

Fluoride Varnish Process

  • the dentist will polish the tooth surface
  • drying the teeth with air syringe to set the pre-varnished fluoride
  • putting the fluoride gel on the fluoride tray
  • placing the fluoride tray on both upper and lower teeth surfaces, leaving well for 4-5 minutes
  • removing the fluoride tray and rinsing the gel off the teeth surfaces

 

Fluoride Varnish Duration

Fluoride Varnish usually takes about 10 minutes with the child and parents’ corporation.

 

Lifespan of Fluoride Varnish

It is recommended that children should get fluoride varnish at least twice a year. However, children with tooth decay risks may get fluoride varnish more often.

 

Fluoride Varnish Aftercare

  • • avoid having food and drink within 30 minutes after the fluoride varnish treatment
  • • take good care of oral health by brushing the teeth, using dental floss and mouthwash
  • • may have an appointment with the dentist every 6 months to check the oral condition

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Q : Is it fine to use fluoride toothpaste instead of having the fluoride varnish treatment?
A : It is better to have the fluoride varnish treatment as well. Fluoride quantity in children’s toothpaste is smaller than the adult’s, to prevent the children from swallowing too much fluoride from the toothpaste.

 

Q : Is it fine to use fluoride toothpaste instead of having the fluoride varnish treatment?
  • Acute Fluoride Toxicity When excessive amount of fluoride is consumed at once (the whole varnish is swallowed), the patient may have side effects such as nausea, throw up, and stomachache. Emergency treatment may include drinking large amount of milk to slow down the effects.
  • Chronic Fluoride Toxicity may cause dental fluorosis or the appearance of faint white lines on the teeth, however there is still no supporting study if chronic fluoride toxicity is relevant to dental fluorosis